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TV Review : MINDHUNTER

TV Reviews

TV Review : MINDHUNTER

TV Review : MINDHUNTER

Netflix’s newest drama, MINDHUNTER, is a period place. Set in the late 1970s, it follows FBI Special Agent Holden Ford, who is a hostage negotiator. Assigned to teach at Quantico, and meeting and falling for a sociology major who challenges his beliefs, Holden begins to wonder if the agency’s ignorance of psychology is holding them back. Setting out on the road with senior agent Bill Tench to educate and learn from local police departments, Holden looks for a better way to do things.

Holden is brilliantly played by Broadway heavyweight Jonathan Groff (Looking, Glee). No, the agent doesn’t sing, but Groff is talented beyond the realms of musicals and comedy. He captures the nuance of a man who is both masculine and sensitive, bucking the stereotype of what an FBI agent might think he should be, just as Holden seeks to change the way of thinking of law enforcement about criminals. There is a lot of nuance Holden, struggling with his own preconceptions, wanting to be open, seeking to improve himself, and above all, dedicated to his mission. Groff gets all of this, and there’s as much acted beyond the dialogue as there is spoken words. He is a key part of why MINDHUNTER is great.

The supporting cast is also excellent. There seem to be three of note in the pilot: Holt McCallany (Lights Out) plays Tench, who will clearly be the one, aside from Groff, with the most screen time, as he’s sort of Holden’s partner. Cotter Smith (The Americans) is Shepard, Holden’s boss at the onset, who has faith in Holden, but doesn’t always understand his motivations or ideas. Hannah Gross (I Used to Be Darker) is Debbie, the love interest and intellectual equal (or possibly superior) of Holden, who sparks more than an academic interest from him. Each have terrific chemistry with Holden, and seem to be the stars in their own stories, not just existing to serve our lead. Granted, we may not see their stories, but they don’t act like their world revolves around Holden, a trap too many television characters fall into.

The production is, overall, excellent. The writing is smart and meaningful. The look and direction is terrific. An early hostage scene in which the camera is far away from the perp really sells to the audience the frustrations of the situation and the gap between Holden and his query. The pacing is perfect, taking its time, but not too slow. Period-wise, it looks appropriate for the time without leaning so heavily into it that it feels dated. With episodes ranging from 36 to 60 minutes, it is clearly content to go at its own speed, not beholden to confining structure. I thoroughly enjoyed every minute of it, and find no cause to complain.

The subject matter is important and timely, today’s mass shootings replacing yesterday’s serial killers in the forefront of our cultural consciousness. As Holden points out late in the pilot, philosophers and writers have been struggling to understand why anyone would do anything since the dawn of man, and we still don’t get it. But we’ve made progress, and those who need to know these things should be aware. MINDHUNTER may cause viewers to rethink their own views, considering the perspectives of others, and challenging the existence of broad generalities. It’s a thinker, in a good way.

MINDHUNTER has been getting rave reviews, and I fully agree. I’ve seen it compared to Mad Men, a complex glimpse of one slice of society at a transformative time, and it is that. But it’s also entirely its own thing, an original work that explores something worthwhile. It has already been renewed for a second season, a deserved vote of confidence from Netflix. I cannot recommend it enough, and can’t wait to jump into the other nine episodes.

MINDHUNTER’s complete first season is available now exclusively on Netflix.

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